ISP monitoring UK and censorship

The nonsense around Darknets.

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embleton
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ISP monitoring UK and censorship

Post by embleton » Mon Apr 22, 2019 8:38 pm

The internet uses a system known as DNS for interpreting a fully qualified domain name (FQDN) into numerical form so routing can be performed between computers, it is not the only methods available for maintaining a routing table. If you use another method of routing most countries don't like it for the system is then known as the darknet, TOR isn't it that is poorly thought out and broken. The DNS system is mainly unencrypted currently and an IP address, not an FQDN is used for access to the DNS system.

ISP broadband services are not blocking the DNS system they are actively blocking the use of any DNS service outside their control. This allows them greater control over traffic leaving or/and entering the ISP for protecting children; replacing the router will not remove this control in itself other methods need to be used as well, eg: DNS encryption (DoH), using a different port for DNS other than UDP 53 whether encrypted or not, alternative routing. Alternatively, you use everything as one method does not exclude other methods for use.

Most wish to watch content that is outside the UK.

The method of detecting whether you're in the UK and blocking access from the UK is known as IP geofencing. The UK also uses IP geofencing to block other countries from accessing UK services like BBC TV, it's the firewall of the UK. The firewall for the UK will be improved in the coming year, that is for sure if you've been watching the news!

To overcome IP geofencing then your IP address must be reported accordingly by the remote system and in that country whether USA or wherever. And if you use a VPN/proxy for this purpose then this must not be known by the remote system for they will likely block access to their service once a proxy/VPN is detected, eg: no system is effective for allowing access to a service that uses IP geofencing 100% of the time or into the future when accessed outside that country/region.

The methods actively implemented by the UK, in my option, will not improve the safety for children but drive them closer and closer to the Darknet until they are actively and actually using it for they are not stupid.



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Re: ISP monitoring UK and censorship

Post by embleton » Tue Apr 23, 2019 5:04 am

What is concerning is that the internet is not for global consumption anymore with different services, countries and regions deciding what is and what is not acceptable for a political, distribution, or legal reason like libel in the UK in comparison to the USA.

This is the sort of censorship worldwide that shouldn't really occur, in my option, or should it? The world seems to be moving apart not together in a global relationship with our internet companions.

And then the arguments about age-restricted content pops up as a justification for the primary reason for censorship, what? And the UK government is talking about fake news censorship and I argue is it not up to an adult to decide whether the story is factual, or is it the government responsibility? And why are the two linked in a whitepaper recently published?

The age-restricted content survey was done by an organisation, I believe, a 1000 children sample on whether they'd accessed age-restricted content, with a biased questionnaire and tick-boxes and reimbursement for filling it out?

Clearly, tighter controls over our children seem to be warranted but aren't the parents responsible or a government censorship system applying to everyone and poorly thought out at that? WIth the resources going to a private company for setting up an age-verification system, pornographic publisher at that and overseen by BBFC, why don't we just build an intranet for our children and isolate it from a system really designed for adults?

The online harms whitepaper, now that is a laugh surely?

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